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…The 1959 Opel T-1 gets good fuel economy?

1959 Opel T-1

Though it doesn’t look like much, this 1959 Opel T-1 managed to get 376.59 miles per gallon back in 1973! How did it manage such an impressive number?

  • The weight was reduced as much as possible by stripping out every part of the interior except for the seat.
  • The wind resistance was reduced by chopping the top down to a lower height.
  • Friction was reduced by narrowing the rear axle and using super-hard low-friction tires.
  • Weight and parasitic fuel loss due to slippage was eliminated with the use of a chain drive.
  • The fuel line was insulated and heated to enter the combustion chamber as lean vapor.
  • The car was driven at a steady 30 mph using the stock 4-cylinder engine.

It doesn’t take much, does it?

Prius owners, you have met your match.

[Via: TreeHugger Via: Seattle Pi]

…The RENNtech/Aixro XR50 is a quick kart?

RENNtech/Aixro XR50

RENNtech is known for making Benzmobiles go like rocketships, and the Mercedes-McLaren SLR 722 GT makes 671 horsepower, but for true speed, you need to check out the RENNtech/Aixro XR50, a kart with a 50 horsepower rotary engine that weighs little more than the driver itself.

Featuring body mods that mimic its bigger brother, the XR50, which sits just inches off the ground, is probably one of the most fun (and most scary) means of four-wheel transportation ever created.

Just remember: Keep it rubber side down.

[Via: Carscoop]

…It’s a large world?

Small WorldThe irony of this story is almost too much to handle: Apparently, the Small World ride at Disneyland can’t handle the big world that we currently live in.

The ride was built in 1963, and was designed to hold male riders that averaged 175 pounds, and female riders that averaged 135 pounds.

Unfortunately, as we all know, those averages are no longer true, and the boats are starting to bottom out under all of the extra weight.

To combat this problem, ride operators are leaving empty seats, but even this doesn’t seem to prevent the bottoming out, so the ride is going to have to be reengineered to handle the extra pounds.

I guess it’s not such a small world after all.

[Via: Consumerist]

[Photo Via: cokeisit7]